Interesting: Sturm, Ruger is the country’s largest gun maker, according to the most-recent figures from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (BATFE). The agency’s “Firearms Commerce in the United States Annual Statistical Update” interim report for 2018 shows that firearms industry manufacturing volume moved up about 4% from 2017 to 2018, from 8.3 million guns made to 8.7 million firearms made last year, or around 2012 levels (8.6 million). The largest companies by manufacturing volume include publicly-traded companies Sturm, Ruger (RGR) and Smith & Wesson (under the holding company American Outdoor Brands Corp., AOBC). According to the 2017 Annual Firearms Manufacturing and Export Report: Sturm, Ruger & Co. was the largest firearms manufacturer by volume, in part because it builds many more rifles than second-place Smith & Wesson. Ruger is credited with making 781,704 pistols, 172,104 revolvers, and 661,155 rifles in 2017 for a total of 1,614,963 firearms manufactured... (As I recall, there is an intentional lag in the release for these reports, which is why this article cites the 2017 one.)

https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/st...ng-in-the-u-s/

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More Insanity in California: Weeks after the Gilroy Garlic Festival shooting left two San Jose children among the dead, Mayor Sam Liccardo is calling for strict new measures that would be the first of their kind in the nation to curb [sic] gun violence. Recalling the victims he met in the hospital who want to see the senseless tragedies stop, the mayor on Monday proposed requiring gun owners in the nation’s 10th largest city to either carry liability insurance or pay a fee to cover taxpayer costs – such as emergency response and medical care – associated with firearm violence [sic]. “Gun ownership is an inherently dangerous activity,” Liccardo told reporters at City Hall, adding that simply offering thoughts and prayers is not adequate anymore. “We have to act to protect our communities.” Liccardo likened the proposal to attempts to lower smoking rates and car crashes. Motorists, he pointed out, are required to carry auto insurance, and tobacco consumption is taxed both to discourage smoking and cover the costs of smoke-related illnesses and death. But gun rights groups are vowing that if the City Council approves such a requirement, they will take San Jose to court. “We think it’s really misguided,” said George Lee, an attorney representing firearm groups like the Firearms Policy Coalition. Under Liccardo’s plan, liability insurance would cover the accidental discharge of a gun, along with “intentional acts” by people who steal or borrow a gun from a gun owner. He acknowledged that insurers won’t cover “intentional conduct” by a gun owner... (How is any logical person to believe that forcing law-abiding gun owners to purchase this insurance will have any effect on the criminal misuse of firearms? Is the program to be run by the state so that it is the state that collects the premiums? Granted that many renters don't carry such insurance but acts of negligence are typically covered by homeowner-liability policies – a big incentive for personal-injury attorneys to sue them.)

https://www.mercurynews.com/2019/08/...ity-insurance/

Meanwhile: A federal judge in Los Angeles rejected the city’s request to throw out a National Rifle Association lawsuit challenging a new law that requires contractors to disclose all business ties to the organization. The NRA says the law violates its First Amendment rights to free speech and association by discriminating against the group over its viewpoints and trying to freeze out its corporate supporters. U.S. District Judge Stephen Wilson on Monday rejected the city’s argument that contractors’ involvement with the NRA – such as offering discounts – isn’t “expressive” within the meaning of the First Amendment... The judge is still considering an NRA request for an order blocking the ordinance while it pursues its lawsuit to nullify the measure. He set another hearing for Sept. 9...

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...disclosure-law

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Politics in North Carolina: [ Gov.] Roy Cooper said Monday that he signed an executive directive meant to strengthen background checks for gun buyers. Cooper said he signed the directive to his cabinet agencies to “build on the work we are already doing” around gun violence and safety. “A background check is only as good as the information in the database,” Cooper told hundreds of safety and education leaders at the Department of Public Safety’s Back To School Safety Summit on Monday afternoon at UNC Greensboro. “Over the last 14 months, more than 284,000 convictions have been added to the federal background check system,” Cooper said. Those were added by the National Instant Criminal Background Check System working group, which Cooper convened last year to identify and fix gaps in firearm background checks. The State Bureau of Investigation was directed to lead the work. Cooper expressed disappointment in Republican leaders not wanting to take up two House bills – HB 86, which includes several gun regulations, and HB 454, described as a “red flag” bill... (Surprise, surprise, surprise! Cooper is a Democrat.)

https://www.newsobserver.com/news/po...233779787.html

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Brewing in Oklahoma: A Democratic state lawmaker from Oklahoma City filed paperwork Monday seeking a public vote on whether to reject a bill that would allow people in the state to openly carry firearms without a background check or training. Rep. Jason Lowe’s referendum petition targets a bill passed overwhelmingly last session that quickly became the first signed by the state’s new Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt. The bill is scheduled to take effect Nov. 1. “This bill was railroaded through the Legislature to the governor’s desk,” said Lowe, who was flanked at a press conference by church leaders and members of the gun safety group Moms Demand Action. “I have long thought this bill was not only a bad idea, but bad practice for our state.” Lowe said he was inspired to launch the petition after mass shootings in Texas and Ohio this month that left more than 30 people dead. Supporters of the repeal will face a tight deadline to gather the nearly 60,000 signatures before the end of August that are required to get the question on the ballot in 2020. An attorney for the group, Brian Ted Jones, said he expects supporters to begin gathering signatures as early as Wednesday... (I fail to see how any logical person could conflate the waiver of the licensing requirement to carry a handgun in public with the recent rapid mass murders. People who are willing to die during their rampage or stand trial for murder couldn't care less about the legalities of carrying a gun to the scene. On the other hand, relieving honest citizens of the costs associated with licensure could result in more rapid armed responses to these still relatively rare incidents.)

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...ermitless-car/

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At Least Texans Have the Option: More El Paso residents than ever before crowded into a class over the weekend to become certified to carry a concealed gun in public in Texas after this month’s mass shooting at a Walmart store that killed 22 people. Guadalupe Segovia, 35, was at the class with her two children. She said her military husband had long been pushing for her to get a concealed-carry license [sic], which allows the holder to wear a gun hidden under their clothes or carry it in a purse when they are in public. Segovia said she felt urgency to do the required training now after the attack hit close to home. “I’m still going to be scared, even carrying a weapon,” she said. The vast majority of people at the classes were Hispanic; El Paso is a predominantly Latino city. Police say the accused gunman deliberately attacked Hispanics in the Walmart. Michael McIntyre, general manager of Gun Central, one of the largest gun shops in El Paso and the host of the class, on Friday said his store tallied double the usual number of sales in the week following the attack, something that did not happen after previous mass shootings in Texas. Most of the sales were for handguns, which can be strapped to an ankle or shoulder under clothing. “I have over 50 for this Saturday class and approximately the same amount for the Sunday class, and I normally have approximately seven,” McIntyre said. “We actually had two people buy guns here who were actually in the Walmart on the day of the shooting. The other people are just saying, ‘Hey, you know I want to be able to protect myself in the event of something going on’,” he said... (While I don't encourage it, the Texas License to Carry a Handgun also allows open carry. Another quibble with this reporter – I suspect that, while many women insist on carrying in purses, a great many more people carry in belt holsters or pocket holsters than in less practical ankle or shoulder holsters. In 2018, El Paso County only had 1.42% of the state's carry licenses as opposed to roughly 2.93% of the state's population.

https://www.mercurynews.com/2019/08/...o-gun-classes/